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SHELVED \N\TH 
PE 



Montana State Library 



3 0864 1004 9511 1 



3 5h 7SS 

7/ I 1 Third Quarter 

' ^ DISASTER I 1977 

AND 

MONTANA"! ^^e^sency INEWSLETTER 

SERVICES DIVISION 



C.L. Gilbertson Thomas L. Judge John J. Womack 

Administrator Governor The Adjutant General 



STATE DOC UMENTS Ui^ 



AVmNISTRATOR'S MESSAGE 



Budgo^t tarn hcu, pcu>6e.d and I'm iuAe we aZZ izeJi 6oim.t<jn&i> that ouA ^ole. 
in di^ajiteA p^^paAzdnej>6 dou not fitczi-vz thz {^inancAal. i>apponX that it 
de^eAvej, and miidi,. I knoM we at the. State. o{^tQ,n havz that {^zoXlng. I 
ati,o knoM that ^ofi the dolZa/u> 6pe,nt, tht cJjtizen^ oi alt ouA coanttdJ^ 
mM neaoAvz the b^st oveAatl dli,ai>teA pfie.paxe.dnui> pfiotection that thoi,e 
tanittd {^andi> can pfiovide.. 

J{i Me' fie. going to do better. du/Ung the ne.xt budget cycte., nou) ii> the time. 
to bloui OUA oMn honn. ie.t' i> get the. visibility we need and ouA job should 
be ea^ieA. I u)oaZd hope that the. Pablta Inlofmatton i,e66ion at ouA tai>t 
6eminafL muZd aZio heJLp in that tine.. 

I ieel we oAe making pK.ogie.bt> at the Hat-ionat levtl. We didn't a6 {jOA 
06 FVIS {^und-Lng is conceAned. HoMevoA, Congte^si, hai> seveAol pieces o^ 
legislation cuAAentZy intAoduccd ujkich coiild change ouA dtAectton and atso 
give LU, the toots to Moik with. 

The Executive Blanch, by the an.deA 0(j Pfiesidevit Caiten. is atso itadying 
ouA mis-S-Lon and po6i,ible n.eoK.gani.zatt.on. 

I^ yoa have poAticatan. thoughts, make i>uKe youA CongfLe66ional delegation 
is oMoAe 0^ them. And, o^ couAse, anotheA May to make youAseZ^ heoAd is 
tlAough membeAslitp in youA State Local Vinecton.' i> Ai^ociation and the 
United State' JS Civil Ve^ense Council [USCVC] . Both aAe excellent meanA 
ion. letting youA thoughts be known. But, both oAe only ai> e^ecttve as 
you want them to be with youA panticipation and membeAskip'. Ai> the old 
raying goei>, "United we 6tand and divided we {^aU." . 



ON THE LOCAL SCENE 
CASCADE COUNTY 

Cascade County Director, Bill Murray, reports that Gary Gray, Fire Chief of the 
Belt Volunteer Fire Department has developed an excellent slide presentation as 
a result of his experience during the "Belt Disaster" on November 26, 1976 (fire 
and explosions following train derailment). Since Gary has agreed to travel with 
his presentation, you might keep him in mind for future fire department or trans- 
portation training seminars. For further information write: 

Gary Gray, Fire Chief 

Belt Volunteer Fire Department 

% Belt City Hall 

Belt, MT 59412 

FALLON COUNTY 

The Disaster & Emergency Services Office has been trying to get an EMT Course 
started for quite some time. After considerable problems, thanks to the Fallon 
Memorial Hospital Staff, there will be a course starting in November. 

Bob Smeltzer, Fallon County DES Director, has also completed a communications 
study under the new "Emergency Communications Development Plan" format, which is 
one of the first to be submitted and approved by the State and Regional Office. 

MUSSELSHELL COUNTY 

In an effort to update their resource list to be used in case of a natural disaster, 
the Musselshell County Civil Defense under the leadership of Jim Ross, Director, 
has mailed questionnaires to all ranches in the county. Information on local 
resources has proven to be a great asset in past high water conditions as well 
as during a high fire season. All information received becomes the property of 
the county civil defense and is held in strict confidence. 

BUTTE/SILVER BOW COUNTY 

Soon the Butte/Silver Bow County area will join other locations within the State 
who have the "911 Emergency Dial System". Wilma Puich, D.E.S. Director, reports 
that arrangements are being made for the installation of two lines to be located 
within the sheriff's office along with their fire dispatch. Until recently. 
Mountain Bell required local governments to purchase the 911 systems. Now the 
utility has begun supplying the equipment with the only cost to the taxpayer being 
that of installation and monthly rental. For less than $2,000 a year, persons 
with emergencies in the Butte area will soon be able to dial 9-1-1 to reach an 
operator who will dispatch the necessary emergency vehicle, such as a fire truck, 
police car or ambulance. 



WELCOME ABOAR D 

New Director Carl King Blaine County 

New Director Billie H. Wallace Glacier County 

Acting Director Lyle Hill Sanders County 

U.S.C.D.C. NATIONAL CONVENTION 

The following five counties represented Montana at the U.S.C.D.C. National 
Conference held October 2-6, 1977 aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach, California: 

Cascade County Frank Steyaert, County Commissioner 

L.W. Fasbender, County Commissioner 

Judith Basin County Frank Frankovich, Director 

Lewis & Clark County William McKnight, Director 

Ravalli County Margaret Sullivan, Director 

Val 1 ey County Terry Mercer , Di rector 

Earl Daley, County Commissioner 

U.S.C.D.C. REGION SIX CONFERENCE 

Don't Forget 11 The next Region Six U.S.C.D.C. Conference is scheduled for 
June 19-21, 1978 at the Yellowstone Motor Inn in Livingston, Montana. 

NUCLEAR CIVIL PROTECTION PLANNING (NCP ) 

bij Lloyd HzijeA, Cklt^ Vlannax 

Neither advertised, nor a subject for dinner conversation, is the fact that 
undertakers deal routinely with prospective clients on a "pre-need service". 
Realizing that inevitably those patient ground-breakers must be dealt with, people 
do make "prior arrangements" (ie: purchase cemetery lots, make wills, etc.). And 
then there is that "survivors-guaranteed-lottery", commonly known as insurance, 
which most of us play, in a rather matter-of-fact fashion. 

Thank goodness, nuclear warfare doesn't approach the inevitability of death, taxes, 
and the seasons of the yearl 

We admit to a possibility of that kind of catastrophe occurring--but we don't care 
much to even think about the probability of the "ultimate holocaust". Ergo, life 
is risky at best, so we do not seek out "prior-need services". Neither do we insure 
for survival. We can'tl No agents in the yellow pages; no policies available even 
by mail. No government programs, except possibly an official recommendation to 
relocate or to hunker down and try to keep those gamma rays up and away for a week 
or so. 

Shouldn't we be willing to "plan" a self-help program without undue nervousness or 
because of the urgings and strident warnings of the doomsday crowd? If we haven't 
done so already, and if we reside in a potential fallout area--and just about 
everybody in Montana does--we could and should launch a personal low-key, in- 
expensive, and not at all morbid survival plan. It could be a plan loaded with 
big dividends for each of us and our families, just in easel 

-3- 



NUC LEAR CIVIL PROTECTION PLANNING (continued ) 
Simply put, we ought to do this: 

(a) If we live and work in an area where blast effects will occur, should an 
attack come, we should know where to go and what to take with us (assuming 
sufficient warning is given), and 

(b) if we live and work out of the blast-probable areas; know where to "shelter"; 
and what to do to increase our survival odds while we wait for all that 
gamma stuff to dissipate. 

This low-key advice is especially pertinent to tnousands of rural and small town 
folk who have space in their homes that can be marked out for a shelter; beefed 
up to resist radiation; and then stocked austerely--but sufficiently. It simply 
isn't a monumental task--nor is it costly. The one third of the State which lies 
east of the Minuteman Missiles is bound to be swept with fallout--given any 
scenario of attack. The western one third will probably soak up lots of the stuff 
from the west coast and Spokane bursts. The middle one third of Montana's real 
estate, wherein the Missiles lie, will be in deeper trouble. 

If we aren't thinking about this, once in awhile, and making a few non-panic plans, 
we should be. We cannot be constantly looking over our shoulders and speculating 
on the possibility- -let alone the probability- -of the grim prospects of modern 
warfare. That way lies paranoia and even madnessi But neither should we ignore 
the realities of today's shakey world and become fatalistic about it. Like most 
unpleasant or threatening situations we face in living, we can tolerate this one 
by seeking middle ground and choosing to neither over-react nor to deny that a 
threat exists. 



A clever and colorful wall poster observed recently, put it well 
gives you lemons, make lemonade". 



'When life 



DID YOU KNOW- 



If^AT GflSlP- NUCLEAR CIV(L 
PROTECTION PLANNING - 
PROVIDES POR PROTECTING 
PEOPLE "IN PLACe"(W|THINJ _^-- i 
THEIR HOME community), ^ - *^ 
IN TIME OP THREATENED 

ATTACK ON THE U.S 

....OR POR RELOCATING PEOPLE, !F THERE 

IS TIME, PROAA" HISH-RlSK" AREAS TO AREAS 

OF LOWER RISK 






That in a threaten- 
ing SITUATION,OFFICIAL 
INFORMATION AND 
INSTRUCTIONS VOULD 
BE GIVEN THE PUBLIC 
THROUGH RADIO, TV, 
AND NEWSPAPERS. 



MORE FACTS? CONTACT YOUR LOCAL CIVIL DEFENSE 



REGION SIX - "PHASE I & II" 

Mark your calendarll Dates for the upcoming career development courses to be held 
in Region Six are as follows: 

PHASE I Kansas City, MO November 8-18, 1977 

PHASE I Colorado Springs, CO March 7-17, 1978 

PHASE II Colorado Springs, CO May 8-19, 1978 

PHASE II Kansas City, MO August 14-25, 1978 

Remember, that under the new Federal programming, travel and per diem expenses for 
attendance at the Phase Courses held within the Region are reimbursed in full 11 
So get your request in early, if you plan on attending. 

***** 

"Memories from the past". . .PHASE II Class which was held in Colorado Springs, CO., 
from September 26 to October 7, 1977. The "Montana Delegation" (during a class 
tour) is shown standing in front of the "Blast Doors" protecting NORAD'S UNDERGROUND 
COMMAND POST which is located in the heart of Cheyenne Mountain. 




Pictured left to right: Glenn Black, State; Wilma Puich, Butte/Silver Bow Co.; 

Tom Bersuch, Fergus Co.; Pat Beebe, State; Helen Elliott, Pondera Co.; Jim DeTienne, 

Sheridan Co.; Kim Potter, Flathead Co. (Hank Wruck, Gallatin Co. not pictured) 



SEARCH & RESCUE NEWS 

LOCAL SEMINAR HELD 

The Teton County Sheriff's Posse and County Civil Defense Office sponsored a 
Search & Rescue Seminar at the Country Club in Choteau on September 24, 1977. 

Participants at the seminar came from Lewis & Clark, Pondera, Cascade, Glacier, 
Flathead, Toole, Roosevelt and Teton County. 

The program included speakers from a six county area including Cascade County 
DES Director, William Murray who spoke on the importance of communications in 
search activities, especially the importance of knowing what "frequencies" are 
used in surrounding counties. 

Walt McNutt, member of the Teton Ski Patrol, discussed their Avalanche Rescue Plan. 

Pondera County Rescue members detailed how their organization functions when 
involved with water rescue. 

Dr. Marc Johnson, Choteau physician, reviewed different types of equipment that 
might be useful in different rescue situations. One piece of equipment he felt 
might be of use to the organizations present was the oxygen-suction backpack 
which is extremely adaptable to different means of transport. 

The need for proper selection of members for the different types of organizations 
was stressed by George Eusterman, M.D. and member of the Great Falls Mountain 
Patrol . 

Kim Potter, Flathead County DES Director and member of the Flathead County S&R 
along with other S&R members participated in a mock search taken from actual 
experience. Actual radio calls were presented from initial call to completion 
of the rescue. 

Also included on the program was a slide presentation given by Terry Pentilla, 
Sub-District ranger for Glacier Park, of the various rescues that have taken 
place in the park, showing the need for organization, communication and contingency 
plans. 



SEARCH & RESCUE TRAINING 

The National Search and Rescue School conducted on Governor's Island, New York, 
New York, will be accepting applications for nominations until December 23, 1977. 
This school is conducted by a joint U.S. Coast Guard/U.S. Air Force endeavor. 
Costs involved are a $3.00 registration fee, transportation and meals. 

If you are interested, contact the State DES Office for a copy of the brochure 
on the school announcement. 



r 



CRITIQUE SHEET: MONTANA - WARNEX 77-2 
Number participating 56 Counties 

Checkerboard received - (first report) 0900 hours 

(last report) 0911 hours 

Fanout completed (first report) 0913 hours 

(last report) 0941 hours 

Number of sounding sirens 29 Counties 

Number using radio 45 Counties 

Number using T.V 5 Counties 

Number pre-exercise publicity 50 Counties 

Communications used: Telephone 56 Counties 

Radio: 

Law Enforcement 29 Counties 

C.B 30 Counties 

RACES 27 Counties 

NAWAS 14 Counties 

Number of inter-county communications play 15 Counties 

PROBLEMS/GENERAL COMMENTS : 

Sirens stuck, had to hand operate 

Not able to contact some areas 

Poor telephone connections to some areas 

RACES frequency not identified, too much congestion at Helena 

Sirens old, could not stand test 

Telephones were tied up 

CHANGES RECOMMENDED : 

Practically none, a few objected to the dates and others made 
only minor comments. 

REMARKS : 

Generally all agree these exercises are good and practice 
makes perfect. Problem areas are identified quickly and this 
makes the exercises yery beneficial. 

NEW STATE COMMO OFFICER 

Ted Zagurski , a recent graduate of MSU with experience in the field of "design, 
building and repairing computer oriented circuits" has now been hired to fill 
the State Communication's Officer position vacated by Tom Dufresne in July. 



-7- 



RADEF NEWS 

Due to changes in our FY 1978 Calibration and Maintenance (C&M) Contract (RADEF), 
especially in travel funds, we now find it necessary to ask the Local Directors 
for assistance with the Instrument Program if we are going to maintain any 
resemblance of an ongoing program. 

The C&M people will no longer be making instrument exchange or operability test on 
field instruments. This check will be left up to the Local Director. 

Our requirement is that a certain number of instruments have an operability check 
yearly. To satisfy this requirement, we would ask that each county check the first 
thirty (30) within their county and twenty five percent (25%) of those remaining. 
This should be accomplished by next March 1st and annually thereafter. Those kits 
not passing the operability check will be exchanged by your coordinator. 

Battery replacement will be handled on a two year cycle. This will be done with 
the coordinators assistance. 

We would suggest that all kits (Federal, Monitoring and Shelters) be picked up 
between now and next February 15th. In most cases shelter kits are centrally 
located now. Then re-assignment of Federal & Monitoring kits can and should be 
made, however re-assignment should be made only to trained monitors or meter- 
readers. (Those trained within the past three years.) 

A list of kits by number & location will be furnished to all Local Directors and 
Coordinators. These list's will be out by mid-December 1977. 

In order to maintain proper inventory control, we would ask that each Local Director 
furnish us, hopefully by March 2nd, 1978, completed preprinted forms. These forms 
will indicate which kits have been operability checked and their current location. 
If they have been re-assigned, we need to know to whom, by name, address and 
location (ie: police station, fire hall, forest service, etc.). 

RM's, Meter Reader & Refresher Courses will be conducted by C&M personnel and 
coordinators when requested by Local Directors. Subject to budget and time re- 
straints. Counties interested, please contact your coordinator in ample time to 
affect proper scheduling. 

RECAP OF EXCESS PROPERTY ALLOCATIONS (July, August & September 1977) 

Teton County Three h, ton trailers 

Deer Lodge County \ ton trailer 

Park County. Ih ton truck Transferred 

Cascade County Van 

Sweet Grass County 2h ton truck Transferred 

Sweet Grass County Ih ton truck Transferred 

Lewis & Clark County 5 ton truck tractor 

Li ncol n County 10 KW Generator 

Deer Lodge County Jeep 

Jefferson County Ambulance Transferred 



NATURAL DISASTER PLANNING 

Montana hosted the Region VIII Disaster Preparedness Planner's Conference, 
August 9-12, 1977, at the Colonial Motor Inn in Helena. The main purpose of the 
conference was to prepare a "test exercise" for each State's Disaster Plan. 

Attending the conference were State Planners from North Dakota, South Dakota, 
Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and Montana. The Federal Disaster Assistance Administra- 
tion (FDAA) office for Region VIII is located in Denver, Colorado. John Swanson, 
Glenn Garcelon, and Dennis Kwiatkowski represented FDAA at the workshop. 

The material formulated at this workshop was prepared to test the State plan. The 
exercise objectives are to stimulate the subjective responses from key State 
agencies rather than generating true-false answers regarding the State Disaster 
Plan's implementation. 

The workshop was regarded as a great success, not only for the work that was 
accomplished, but also for the assistance provided by the FDAA representatives. 

The meeting was topped-off with a lakeside picnic and barbeque, fishing, horse- 
shoe throwing and a final visiting session. 

CB's AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT 

An "Assessment of the Social Consequences of the Adoption and use of Citizen's 
Band Radio in the United States" has been funded ($136,000) by the National 
Science Foundation. The study, being conducted at the Denver Research Institute, 
will include a case study of CB influence on disaster management under the 
supervision of Thomas Drabek, University of Denver, to gather information about 
the extent of CB usage, awareness of rumors, internal policing measures, and 
problems or benefits of CB participation. Information may be received from: 

F.Floyd Shoemaker, Principal Investigator 

Denver Research Institute 

University of Denver 

Denver, CO 80208 

(303) 753-3676 



PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Did you know?? That there is a "DID YOU KNOW?" series of lifesaving information 
in camera-ready copy for your use in a public information program? 

The series is comprised of eight separate sheets (see sample on next page) with 
information of possible interest to the public. The series do not have to be run 
in any specific order, as each panel tells its own story. Nor does the entire 
series have to be printed in your local newspaper. 

If you are interested in more information on the series, please contact the State 
DES Office. 



-9- 



DID YOU KNOW- 



"^HAT IM EVENT OF~NUCLEAR, 
ATTACK, RADlOACTiVE^~ 
FALLOUT COULD COVER 
LARSE AREAS OF THE U.S.? 

"tTwAT EXPOSURE TO THE PENETRATING 
GAMMA RAYS FROM FALLOUT PARTICLES 
CAN CAUSE INJURY AND DEATH? 





ilELDlNG FROM ' r//^ \|.|L 

RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT IS ESSENTIAL. 
SHELTERS CAN PROTECT PEOPLE FROM 
HARM UNTIL FALLOUT RADIATION "DECAYS" 
TO SAFE LEVELS. 

MO«e PACTS? CONTACT YOUR LOCAL CIVIL DEFENSE 



DID YOU KNOW- 



^HAT THE ATTAC< Wl^llGS^ §l]m/M.oo. 




IS A WATERING TO/V£ OR SHORT BLA5T5 

LASTING FOR 3 TO 5 /VUNUTES - IT SIGNALS 

THAT AN ACTUAL ATTACK AGAINST THIS COUNTRY HAS 
BEEN DETECTED AND THAT YOU SHOULD. . . TAKE 

PROTECT/ \^£ ACTION /MMEPIATELY 
^^T THE/ijYENriOM^^MERTS/(^mL... 




IS A STEADY BLA'ST o^TONE lasting 

3T05 MINUTE'5 - AND ON HEARING THIS 
YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO YOUR RADIO OR TV FOR 
ESSENTIAL EMERGENCY INFORMATION CONCERN- 
INS THREATENING DISASTERS IN PEACETIME. 

MORE FACTS'? contact Your local civil defense 



DID YOU KNOW- 



1/HERE ARE MORE THAN 40 
THOUSAND RADIOLOGICAL FALLOUT 
MONITORING STATIONS 
IN THE U.S., WHICH WOULD 
BE MANNED BY TRAINED 
PEOPLE IN EVENT OF A 
NUCLEAR EMERGENCY 



DID YOU KNOW- 





2,226 LOCAL 

GOVERNMENTS 
HAVE OPERA- 
TIONALLY READY 
RADIOLOGICAL 
MONITORING SYSTEMS. 



140 THOUSAND SETS OF RADIOLOGICAL 
MONITORING INSTRUMENTS HAVE BEEN 
DISTRIBUTED FOR USE IN PUBLIC SHELTERS 

/M)A& FACTS? CONTACT YOOK LOCAL CIVIL DEFEI^ISE 




l/'^HAT BLAST & HEAT 
FROM A NUCLEAR 
EXPLOSION COVER A 
RELATIVELY SMALL 
AREA, BUT DEADLY 
FALLOUT COULD 
EXTEND MANY HUN- 
DREDS OF MILES 
DOWNWIND. 



THE NATIONWIDE SYSTEM 

OF FALLOUT SHELTERS 

COULD SAVE MANY 

MILLIONS OF LIVES IN 

EVENT OF NUaBAR ATTACK I FALLOUT SHELTERS 




N\ORE FACTS? coNiAcr youn local civil- oefcnse 



-10- 



DROUGHT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS 

All counties in the State became eligible on August 22, 1977, to apply to the 
Federal Disaster Assistance Administration for two drought assistance programs; 
the Emergency Livestock Feed and the Cattle Transportation Programs. Applications 
were processed through the State Disaster and Emergency Services Division Office 
until September 29, 1977. 

On that date, the President signed the Food and Agriculture Act of 1977, transfer- 
ring responsibility for Federal funding of emergency drought assistance for live- 
stock from the Federal Disaster Assistance Administration (FDAA), to the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA's, Agricultural Stabilization and 
Conservation Service (ASCS) will administer the emergency drought assistance 
programs. 

Requests from counties, through the Governor's Office, which had been submitted 
to FDAA previous to the Act and which were still pending, will be transferred to 
USDA for action under the new authority. These requests will not have to be 
resubmitted. Livestock producers and other interested persons should contact 
their county ASCS representatives for details of the new program. 

County Commissioners are no longer required to be involved in the application 
process, since it is direct from ASCS to the producer under the new program. 



NOAA WEATHER RADIO SYSTEM 

Tne Disaster & Emergency Services Division is coordinating efforts by the 
National Weather Service and the State Communication's Division to make the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Weather Radio System a reality 
in Montana within the next year. 

For background information, the NOAA Weather Radio is a system planned of approxi- 
mately eight VHF-FM transmitters strategically located througnout the State. Each 
station will have a frequency of 162.40 MHz or 162.5b MHz. It will broadcast a 
three (3) to five (5) minute program of weather information, continuously repeated, 
throughout the twenty-four hours. The information will be updated frequently by 
Weather Service personnel, as needed. It will also have the capability for 
immediate broadcast of severe weather warnings and other nuclear or natural disaster 
information. 

One station is now operational in the Great Falls area on a test basis on 162.55 MHz. 
The second should be operational in the Helena area prior to the end of this year. 

To utilize the system individuals are required to purchasea NOAA Weather Radio 
Receiver. However, there are many different models available in different price 
ranges for individuals to choose from. 



-n- 



FOREST SERVICE ASSISTANCE IN RURAL NUCLEAR AND FIRE DEFENSE 

DCPA recently met with representatives of the USDA (Forest Service) to explore 
possibilities for cooperation to reduce duplication of effort and increase the 
total effectiveness of combating nuclear disasters in rural areas. The Forest 
Service in cooperation with State Forestry organizations currently sponsor a 
program which makes Federal excess personal property available for loan to 
volunteer fire departments in rural areas. 

Due to the similarity of the Forest Service's mission in rural fire protection 
and DCPA's nuclear disaster mission, it appears that a great deal of efficiency 
and mutual benefit could be gained by a partnership between the two agencies at 
the field level. The Forest Service and State Forestry organizations can provide; 

1. Capability to train rural fire companies and departments. 

2. Detailed conversion plans for modifying most military vehicles for 
nuclear and fire emergencies. Field organizations to assist in the 
administration of an excess property program. 

3. State-wide communications facilities. 

4. Limited funding for fire companies to modify fire vehicles. 



EBS UPDATE 



During this past summer, conferences were held in Billings, Great Falls and 
Missoula with the Emergency Broadcast Committee of the Montana Broadcaster's 
Assn. (MBA) chaired by Dick Kober, KGHL Billings. In addition to the State and 
Local disaster and emergency service directors in attendance, the National Weather 
Service, Federal Communications Commission and Region VI Defense Civil Preparedness 
Agency, also participated. The workshops discussed and updated the Emergency 
Broadcast Operational Plans for the entire State. It is anticipated that the 
MBA will have their plans completed in four to six weeks. It is still our goal 
to have a viable State and Local Emergency Broadcast System to aid our warning 
capabil ity. 

Along the same lines. Region VI - DCPA is in the process of awarding contracts 
to provide Electro Magnetic Pulse (EMP) protection for KGHL, Billings and KCAP 
in Helena, Montana. 



"ThAJ> hcLf> been a tut. ..had thi& 
b2.Q.n an actual QjneA.ge.ncij, you can 
bet ijoun. booty I uiouldn t i>tAlZ 
be. heAc tatlzing tnto tkii> micn.ophom. 




-^ -12- 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

NOVEMBER 1977: Phase I (? Battle Creek, MI Oct 31 - Nov 11 

Graduate Seminar @ Battle Creek, MI Nov 14 - Nov 18 

Phase I @ Kansas City, MO Nov 8 - Nov 18 

DECEMBER 1977: Phase III @ Battle Creek, MI Nov 28 - Dec 9 



FEBRUARY 1978: Phase III Battle Creek, Michigan Feb 6 - Feb 17 

Governor's Conference for Public Officials 

(3 Helena Feb 15 



MARCH 1978: WARNEX 78-1.. Mar 7 

Phase I Colorado Springs, CO Mar 7 - Mar 17 

APRIL 1978: Phase III Battle Creek, MI Apr 3 - Apr 14 

Phase II (a Battle Creek, MI Apr 17 - Apr 28 

MAY 1978: Phase IV @ Battle Creek, MI May 15 - May 26 

Phase II @ Colorado Springs, CO May 8 - May 19 

JUNE 1978: Accidental Missile Launch Exercise June 8 

Phase III @ Battle Creek, MI Jun 5 - Jun 15 



JULY 1978: Trans-Attack Do-it-Yourself Exercise 



AUGUST 1978: WARNEX 78-2 (Internal (a Region level) Aug 23 

Trans-Attack Do-it-Yourself Exercise 

Phase III @ Battle Creek Aug 14 - Aug 25 

Phase II (3 Kansas City Aug 14 - Aug 25 

SEPTEMBER 1978: Trans-Attack Do-it-Yourself Exercise 

Phase IV @ Battle Creek, MI Sep 18 - Sep 29 



OCTOBER 1978: WARNEX 78-3 Oct M 

DECEMBER 1978: WARNEX 78-4 (Internal @ Region level) Dec 5 



-13- 



MOULAGE KITS 

As discussed at the October 1977 meeting of Montana's Civil Defense Directors, 
the State D.E.S. Office has three "Moulage Kits" (Multiple casualty similation kit) 
which can be loaned to Local Directors for use in making their exercises "more 
realistic". 

However, those who may be interested in obtaining their own kit may contact the 
following dealer for more information: 

Harrington's Surgical Supply 
53 E. Broadway 
Butte, MT 
Phone: 723-6541